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ENG001 Elementary English Assignments No.03 Solution and Discussion Fall 2013 Due Date: February 18, 2014

Eng001 Elementary English: (Fall 2013)

 

Assignment No.3

Total Marks: 15

Lesson 20-26

 

Objectives

 

To assess the students’ creative skills and overall concepts studied through lectures

 

Instructions

 

1. Assignments sent after the Due Date will not be accepted.

2. Corrupt files will be marked zero.

3. Assignments should be zoomed in at 100%.

4. Plagiarism will NOT be tolerated. Plagiarism means taking credit for someone else’s work by presenting it as your own.

5. No marks will be awarded for copied assignments and the case may be referred to the discipline committee for a suitable action.

6. No assignment will be accepted through e-mail.

7. Submit your work in MS Word file. Files other than MS Word will not be accepted.

7. Font color should be preferably black and font size should be 12 Times New Roman.

 

Q1. Develop the idea contained in any ONE of the following in about 150 words. (10 marks)

 

a-      Cowards die many times before their death.

b-     Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard are sweeter

 

 

Q2. Fill in the blanks with the best-suited terms. (5 marks)

 

1-      “Now” is a ________ signal.

2-      “For instance” is a ______ signal.

3-      A ­______ is a collection of related sentences dealing with a single topic.

4-      ________ can be used to link ideas from different sentences.

5-      A ______ indicates in a general way what idea or thesis the paragraph is going to deal with. 

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Cowards Die Many Times before Their Deaths?
Answer
The quote, 'Cowards die many times before their death' was written by William Shakespeare. The quote can be found in Julius Caesar in Act 2 and Scene 2. In, this play, it is Caesar who states the quote.

Cowards Die Many Times before Their Deaths by William Shakespeare.


Shakespeare can be difficult to understand sometimes, because he tends to use a lot of metaphors in his writing, and it's hard to decipher what some of those metaphors mean. The best way to try to understand any difficult quotation is to break down the quotation into smaller phrases and tackle each one of them separately.
You've already probably figured out that, in this quotation, Shakespeare is drawing a comparison between someone who is a coward (that is, someone who is afraid to face the challenges of life, such as dealing with difficult situations, taking risks, and fighting for what he or she believe in) and someone who is valiant (that is, someone who is brave in facing the challenges of life, is never afraid to face difficult or risky situations, and will always fight for what he or she believes in).

When you look at just the first part of the quotation, "Cowards die many times before their deaths," try to think of how someone can actually "die many times" before they actually die. Right away, you realize that Shakespeare is using death as a metaphor (because a person can't physically die multiple times in a single lifetime). Here, he uses the metaphor of death to convey how a person feels inside when he or she runs away from a challenge. That person "dies" a little inside each time he or she chickens out, meaning that he or she loses a little strength of character each time he or she refuses to face a challenge of life.

Now take the second part of the quotation, "The valiant never taste of death but once." Shakespeare is saying that a valiant person dies only once, which probably means when he or she actually physically dies. So, Shakespeare isn't using death as a metaphor in this part of the quotation. He is saying that a person who is not afraid to face the challenges of life doesn't "die" inside like the coward does. This person can hold their head up high and be proud that he or she faced that difficult situation or fought for what he or she believed in. So, when this brave and valiant person physically dies, this is the only time he or she will know death because he or she has never been afraid to face the challenges of life.

“Heard Melodies Are Sweet, but Those Unheard Are Sweeter”

This line from “Ode on a Grecian Urn” is an example of Keats arguing that the power of thought, the imagination and anticipation is often greater than the act itself. Music and “melodies” that are imagined and anticipated are always in tune. They are played perfectly. A melody composed in the mind, cannot possibly be played badly or incorrectly. There is no possibility of error or an imperfect note. Therefore, Keats believes that imagining something brings more fulfilment and contentment than a “real” version ever could. He thinks that anticipation and expectation often outweighs the copy in the real world and that something real can only be disappointing compared to the imaginary.

In a similar way, Plato thought that life, material things, reality were like a shadow on a cave wall: he believed that like the shadow made by the flame behind the true image, we and the world in which we live, are an imperfect copy of a perfect world that can only exist in imagination and thought. Keats could even have been thinking of this when he wrote the line.

This belief that things of the mind are more beautiful and enjoyable than things bound by the constraints of reality is a recurring feature of Keats’s poems. In “The Eve of St. Agnes”, although Porphyro and Madeline escape together their love is never consummated, they never kiss, we never find out the end of the story and our expectation of what will happen is left, suspended in eternity. To finish the story would be to destroy the perfect, imagined conclusion and replace it with a real one which has an end and cannot possibly be as good as the picture in our minds. In “Ode to a Nightingale”, the Nightingale is part of an imagined world through the glass of a window. Keats tells us that such a place should be sought after in order to escape the “drowsy numbness” of the real world which does not produce anything to match the Nightingale and its song.

In this case, however, Keats is writing about the pipes and timbrels embossed onto the urn and is imagining them playing. He imagines such sweet melodies that he wants them to play on, not in reality to his “sensual ear”, but in his mind because there they are faultless and eternal; whereas in reality they are not only imperfect but finite.

The poem is about immortalising things through poetry and through the realms of our imagination. The urn is immortalised through Keats’s poem and the “sweet melodies” are perfectly immortalised through our own thought and imagination.

Q-2 Answers

1-Sequence

2-Illustration

3-  paragraph

4- Transition words

5- topic sentence

Cowards Die Many Times before Their Deaths by William Shakespeare.

Shakespeare can be difficult to understand sometimes, because he tends to use a lot of metaphors in his writing, and it's hard to decipher what some of those metaphors mean. The best way to try to understand any difficult quotation is to break down the quotation into smaller phrases and tackle each one of them separately.
You've already probably figured out that, in this quotation, Shakespeare is drawing a comparison between someone who is a coward (that is, someone who is afraid to face the challenges of life, such as dealing with difficult situations, taking risks, and fighting for what he or she believe in) and someone who is valiant (that is, someone who is brave in facing the challenges of life, is never afraid to face difficult or risky situations, and will always fight for what he or she believes in).
When you look at just the first part of the quotation, "Cowards die many times before their deaths," try to think of how someone can actually "die many times" before they actually die. Right away, you realize that Shakespeare is using death as a metaphor (because a person can't physically die multiple times in a single lifetime). Here, he uses the metaphor of death to convey how a person feels inside when he or she runs away from a challenge. That person "dies" a little inside each time he or she chickens out, meaning that he or she loses a little strength of character each time he or she refuses to face a challenge of life.
Now take the second part of the quotation, "The valiant never taste of death but once." Shakespeare is saying that a valiant person dies only once, which probably means when he or she actually physically dies. So, Shakespeare isn't using death as a metaphor in this part of the quotation. He is saying that a person who is not afraid to face the challenges of life doesn't "die" inside like the coward does. This person can hold their head up high and be proud that he or she faced that difficult situation or fought for what he or she believed in. So, when this brave and valiant person physically dies, this is the only time he or she will know death because he or she has never been afraid to face the challenges of life.

“Heard Melodies Are Sweet, but Those Unheard Are Sweeter”
This line from “Ode on a Grecian Urn” is an example of Keats arguing that the power of thought, the imagination and anticipation is often greater than the act itself. Music and “melodies” that are imagined and anticipated are always in tune. They are played perfectly. A melody composed in the mind, cannot possibly be played badly or incorrectly. There is no possibility of error or an imperfect note. Therefore, Keats believes that imagining something brings more fulfilment and contentment than a “real” version ever could. He thinks that anticipation and expectation often outweighs the copy in the real world and that something real can only be disappointing compared to the imaginary.
In a similar way, Plato thought that life, material things, reality were like a shadow on a cave wall: he believed that like the shadow made by the flame behind the true image, we and the world in which we live, are an imperfect copy of a perfect world that can only exist in imagination and thought. Keats could even have been thinking of this when he wrote the line.
This belief that things of the mind are more beautiful and enjoyable than things bound by the constraints of reality is a recurring feature of Keats’s poems. In “The Eve of St. Agnes”, although Porphyro and Madeline escape together their love is never consummated, they never kiss, we never find out the end of the story and our expectation of what will happen is left, suspended in eternity. To finish the story would be to destroy the perfect, imagined conclusion and replace it with a real one which has an end and cannot possibly be as good as the picture in our minds. In “Ode to a Nightingale”, the Nightingale is part of an imagined world through the glass of a window. Keats tells us that such a place should be sought after in order to escape the “drowsy numbness” of the real world which does not produce anything to match the Nightingale and its song.





Q-2 Answers
1-Sequence
2-Illustration
3- paragraph
4- Transition words
5- topic sentence

Question No 1  Part A

Cowards die many times before their death

Answer

The saying 'cowards may die many times before their deaths, but the valiant never taste of death but once' is a very powerful saying. This means a coward will face shame of being a coward and will die or give up many times. The valiant means the brave who will never taste of death but once will stay brave and steady and see it through to the end standing up to anything.

John Keats — 'Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard are sweeter


Answer

It's an expression of the whole thesis of the poem -- "Thou still-unravished bride of quietness," etc. Throughout the "Ode," Keats asserts that it's the imagination, not our expression of it, that is the most powerful. (And of course, the irony is that this is one of the greatest expressions of imagination ever put to words.)

The idea is that a "heard melody" -- that is, music you hear -- may be sweet, but an "unheard melody" -- music you only imagine -- can be as sweet as your imagination wills it to be. Keats took the notion from the paintings on a piece of Greek pottery, the figure of a man playing a syrinx (pipes of Pan) to a woman; because it's just an image of someone playing music, you can't hear what he was playing, but you can IMAGINE it to be as beautiful as you wish.

The middle and later portion of the "Ode" deals with another classical theme, that life is short and art endures -- the figures on the urn are "forever panting and forever young," while passion among the living leaves one with a heart "high-sorrowful and cloyed." (To cloy, if it's an unfamiliar word, means to consume too much of something sweet, and by extension to have too much of any pleasure.)

One other phrase that gives modern readers fits:

"O Attic shape! Fair attitude! With brede 
Of marble men and maidens overwrought..."

In this case, "Attic" is an ancient name for Greece; "attitude" doesn't refer to copping a 'tude, but to the angle and posture of the urn itself; "brede" is an old word for an embroidered pattern such as one might see on a tapestry; and "overwrought" in this case doesn't mean emotionally overwrought, but rather that the urn itself has been overlaid with a pattern, like a tapestry, of marble men and maidens.

For my money, the key line in the poem, though, is:

"...in midst of other woe/Than ours..."

That captures the ability shared by all great art -- music, literature, drama, sculpture, painting -- to pull me out of whatever funk I'm in at the moment, whatever piddling, temporary example of the thousand natural shocks that flesh is heir to that I am suffering, and remind me, as Keats says, that

"Beauty is truth, truth beauty: that is all 
Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know."

The quote, 'Cowards die many times before their death' was written by William Shakespeare. The quote can be found in Julius Caesar in Act 2 and Scene 2. In, this play, it is Caesar who states the quote.

Q1 Part I:

in this quotation, Shakespeare is drawing a comparison between someone who is a coward (that is, someone who is afraid to face the challenges of life, such as dealing with difficult situations, taking risks, and fighting for what he or she believe in) and someone who is valiant (that is, someone who is brave in facing the challenges of life, is never afraid to face difficult or risky situations, and will always fight for what he or she believes in).

When you look at just the first part of the quotation, "Cowards die many times before their deaths," try to think of how someone can actually "die many times" before they actually die. Right away, you realize that Shakespeare is using death as a metaphor (because a person can't physically die multiple times in a single lifetime). Here, he uses the metaphor of death to convey how a person feels inside when he or she runs away from a challenge. That person "dies" a little inside each time he or she chickens out, meaning that he or she loses a little strength of character each time he or she refuses to face a challenge of life.

Now take the second part of the quotation, "The valiant never taste of death but once." Shakespeare is saying that a valiant person dies only once, which probably means when he or she actually physically dies. So, Shakespeare isn't using death as a metaphor in this part of the quotation. He is saying that a person who is not afraid to face the challenges of life doesn't "die" inside like the coward does. This person can hold their head up high and be proud that he or she faced that difficult situation or fought for what he or she believed in. So, when this brave and valiant person physically dies, this is the only time he or she will know death because he or she has never been afraid to face the challenges of life.

Question No:-02

i) Sequence

ii) Illustration

iii)  paragraph

iv) Transition words

v)topic sentence

in question num 1 is a & b both are compolsry or we have to chose one from a or b to develop idea

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