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MTH301 GDB SOLUTION 1 FALL2012 

What are the algebraic advantageous applications of Laplace and Fourier Transforms? Give just one example with proper explanation.

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The Laplace transform is a widely used integral transform with many applications in physics and engineering. Denoted , it is a linear operator of a function f(t) with a real argument t (t ≥ 0) that transforms it to a function F(s) with a complex argument s. This transformation is essentially bijective for the majority of practical uses; the respective pairs of f(t) and F(s) are matched in tables. The Laplace transform has the useful property that many relationships and operations over the originals f(t) correspond to simpler relationships and operations over the images F(s).[1] It is named after Pierre-Simon Laplace, who introduced the transform in his work on probability theory.

The Laplace transform is related to the Fourier transform, but whereas the Fourier transform expresses a function or signal as a series of modes of vibration (frequencies), the Laplace transform resolves a function into its moments. Like the Fourier transform, the Laplace transform is used for solving differential and integral equations. In physics and engineering it is used for analysis of linear time-invariant systems such as electrical circuits, harmonic oscillators, optical devices, and mechanical systems. In such analyses, the Laplace transform is often interpreted as a transformation from the time-domain, in which inputs and outputs are functions of time, to the frequency-domain, where the same inputs and outputs are functions of complex angular frequency, in radians per unit time.
Given a simple mathematical or functional description of an input or output to a system, the Laplace transform provides an alternative functional description that often simplifies the process of analyzing the behavior of the system, or in synthesizing a new system based on a set of specifications.

 MTH301 GDB SOLUTION 1 FALL2012 

The Laplace transform is related to the Fourier transform but whereas the Fourier transform expresses a function or signal as a series of modes of vibration (frequencies), the Laplace transform resolves a function into its moments. Like the Fourier transform, the Laplace transform is used for solving differential and integral equations. In physics and engineering it is used for analysis of linear time-invariant systems such as electrical circuits, harmonic oscillators, optical devices, and mechanical systems. In such analyses, the Laplace transform is often interpreted as a transformation from the time-domain, in which inputs and outputs are functions of time, to the frequency domain, where the same inputs and outputs are functions of complex angular frequency, in radians per unit time. Given a simple mathematical or functional description of an input or output to a system, the Laplace transform provides an alternative functional description that often simplifies the process of analyzing the behavior of the system, or in synthesizing a new system based on a set of specifications.

MTH301 GDB SOLUTION 1 FALL2012 

Fourier Transforms and Laplace Transforms are both frequency space transforms, but one has an imaginary argument and the other a real one. They're associated with different physical situations that dictate where they are used. Fourier Transforms are useful if you want to see the frequency spectrum makeup of a signal -- something you don't get from the Laplace Transform. Laplace Transforms, on the other hand, are useful in solving rate equations. They come in useful if you're taking a course in Diff Q's (Differential Equations). 

Fourier is a subset of Laplace. Laplace is a more generalized transform.

Fourier is used primarily for steady state signal analysis, while Laplace is used for transient signal analysis. Laplace is good at looking for the response to pulses, step functions, delta functions, while Fourier is good for continuous signals.

Transforms are used because the time-domain mathematical models of systems are generally complex differential equations. Transforming these complex differential equations into simpler algebraic expressions makes them much easier to solve. Once the solution to the algebraic expression is found, the inverse transform will give you the time-domain response.

The Laplace transform is a widely used integral transform with many applications in physics and engineering. Denoted , it is a linear operator of a function f(t) with a real argument t (t ≥ 0) that transforms it to a function F(s) with a complex argument s. This transformation is essentially bijective for the majority of practical uses; the respective pairs of f(t) and F(s) are matched in tables. The Laplace transform has the useful property that many relationships and operations over the originals f(t) correspond to simpler relationships and operations over the images F(s).[1] It is named after Pierre-Simon Laplace, who introduced the transform in his work on probability theory.

The Laplace transform is related to the Fourier transform, but whereas the Fourier transform expresses a function or signal as a series of modes of vibration (frequencies), the Laplace transform resolves a function into its moments. Like the Fourier transform, the Laplace transform is used for solving differential and integral equations. In physics and engineering it is used for analysis of linear time-invariant systems such as electrical circuits, harmonic oscillators, optical devices, and mechanical systems. In such analyses, the Laplace transform is often interpreted as a transformation from the time-domain, in which inputs and outputs are functions of time, to the frequency-domain, where the same inputs and outputs are functions of complex angular frequency, in radians per unit time.
Given a simple mathematical or functional description of an input or output to a system, the Laplace transform provides an alternative functional description that often simplifies the process of analyzing the behavior of the system, or in synthesizing a new system based on a set of specifications.

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